Argentine Pass

Argentine Pass

Argentine Pass is a high mountain pass at an elevation of 4.025m (13,207ft) above the sea level, located in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains of central Colorado in the United States. It's one of the highest mountain roads of Colorado.

Located in Summit County, the road over the pass is a rough 4x4 trail. Rocky at the start and very narrow at the top of Argentine Pass. Snow can block trail well into summer. It’s only passable in good weather during the summer. Vehicle travel is only possible on the Georgetown side, the Horseshoe Basin side may only be traversed by foot or by bicycle.
This trail passes through remote areas, so you need to be prepared. 4 wheeling is an inherently dangerous activity and shouldn’t be attempted without the appropriate training and equipment. The road gets very narrow at the top as you climb above 13,000 ft. Don’t miss Santiago Mine and Ghost Town. (Caution: Mine is on private property. Stay on road and well away from buildings.) This is a moderate trail with some very rocky sections and a couple of deep stream crossings.

This track can get very muddy and slippery after rain making it challenging to get through. During and after a storm the road may be impassable, even with a four-wheel-drive vehicle.  Suitable for most high-clearance, 4x4 SUVs. Oversize vehicles should not attempt Argentine Pass. Argentine Pass is a destination most reach by driving their 4x4 or ATV up from Waldorf (out of Georgetown CO). Fantastic views to both sides of the Continental Divide. Grays & Torreys Peaks are visible to the north. After enjoying the view, return the way you came, and enjoy the fun and fast ride back .
Due to the remoteness of the area, take special care to ensure that your vehicle is ready for the trip. Great views of Peru Creek looking down from the top. Spectacular views are enjoyed from both sides of the Continental Divide upon reaching the summit of Argentine Pass. This trail originated as a wagon road in 1867 connecting towns on the western slope of the Continental Divide with the eastern slope towns. 
Pic&Video: Alan Atkins