Passo di Falzarego

Falzarego Pass, a road with 38 steep hairpin bends

Passo di Falzarego is a high mountain pass at an elevation of 2.105m (6,906ft) above the sea level, located in the Veneto region, in the province of Belluno, in Italy.

The pass is traversed by the SR48 (The Great Dolomites Road), a road with 38 steep hairpin bends in stunning scenery. The asphalted road over the Passo di Falzarego connects Andráz and Cortina d'Ampezzo. It has endless curves and serpentines which form a fantastic pass road uphill through evergreen forests. This is a good route with a great surface and with a combination of hairpins, medium fast sweepers and some long straights. The pass was a hard-fought position between the Austrians and Italians in World War II in the Dolomite war and it’s still a well known war memorial. The road offers offers incredible 360 degree views of the majestic Dolomites.

It is one of the key stages of the Giro d'Italia (Tour of Italy). There are 3 routes to reach the summit. Starting from Cortina, the ascent is 16.4 km long. Over this distance, the elevation gain is 913 meters. The average percentage is 5.6 %. Starting from Caprile, the ascent is 20.46 km long. Over this distance, the elevation gain is 1.119 meters. The average percentage is 5.5 %.

And starting from Cortina d’Ampezzo, the ascent is 14.23 km long. Over this distance, the elevation gain is 841 meters. The average percentage is 5.9 %. The name Falza Rego means false king in ladin. On September 13th 1909 the road section of the The Great Dolomites Road  between Arabba and Cortina was inaugurated. It was the last section of the Great Dolomite Road to be opened. Today it is still regarded as a technical masterpiece of road construction.

 

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