Newlands Pass

Newlands Pass: a narrow, perilously steep road in England

Newlands Pass is a mountain pass at an elevation of 333m (1,093ft) above the sea level, located in the English Lake District. The route has humbled many egos. It’s not for the sissies and shouldn’t be attempted by novice drivers.

The road over the pass (also known as Newlands Hause) is paved. It's a narrow, perilously steep road snaking up. It shouldn’t be attempted by those who don't know how to reverse. The road links the Newlands Valley, to the west of Keswick and Derwent Water, with the village of Buttermere. It’s a really fun drive with fantastic views but not for a faint hearted driver especially if the weather is bad. It’s a serious drive which can get quite hairy at times when negotiating with cars coming the other way. This route is not recommended if your passengers are prone to car sickness. Don’t stuff your belly too much. Eventually, you might feel vomiting temptations.

Its many twists, turns and narrows can pose a challenge to even the most experienced drivers. The road is not easy, though. Up, down, right, left all the time. The road has a series of hairpin bends that can be unnerving for drivers of cars and minibuses (heavier vehicles are advised not to use the pass), especially as the tarmac has become quite smooth in places. Driving at night, or in poor visibility, is not recommended for drivers unfamiliar with the road. This road has innumerable twists and turns. The road is single-track and narrow in places with unforgiving dry stone walls. Rising steadily to start with, after a section with a good view ahead the first, more serious inclines appear.

 

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NOTICE: Due to the spread of COVID-19, many points of interest and roads are closed and travel is not recommended. Please follow all local health authority directives before venturing off, and stay safe.