Nairobi-Nakuru Highway

Nairobi-Nakuru, a dangerous highway in Kenya

Nairobi-Nakuru Highway (officially called A104) is an asphalted highway, with a length of 159km, located in Kenya. The road is extremely dangerous. It was recently repaved in an effort to stem road traffic accidents (as it was pretty dangerous before). Sadly this didn't do much to stop the crashes.

Nakuru Road links Nakuru, the capital of Nakuru County and former capital of the Rift Valley Province, and Nairobi, the capital and largest city of Kenya. Unlike most dangerous roads, it's not the road conditions but the drivers that are the main hazard on the Nairobi-Nakuru Highway. After the new reasphalt, drivers saw the smooth road as more of a raceway and now speeding is a massive problem. As are pedestrians walking across the speeding traffic. The Highway is notorious for drink-driving combined with speeding, poor overtaking and pedestrians in the road which resulted in 320 deaths on the Highway in one year alone.
The road is listed among the most dangerous roads in the world, and has been cited as one of the world’s most unsafe roads that is prone to accidents. The main risks are lack of barriers, poor conditions of vehicles, poor driving techniques and weather as major causes of road accidents on the busy highway. This road is mainly dangerous because of driver error and a lack of traffic law enforcement. Defensive driving lessons could make this road much safer, but it is still risky.
The road is in dreadful condition and requires strong nerves to negotiate it. Any barriers along the edge afford little more than token protection; large stretches should be taken at a snail's pace and a lookout kept for vehicles coming from the opposite direction! Recently, the Kenyan Government has begun to crack down on drink driving which has previously been a huge problem. Africa is the world’s most dangerous region for traffic fatalities with 24.1 deaths per 100,000 population in 2010. The main hazards on this road are drink-driving, poor road conditions and roaming animals.
Pic: Sebastian Noethlichs